Move across dog

How to Move across The Country with a Dog

| December 3, 2021 | Travel Guides

Dogs, like us humans, love which is familiar. When you add the fact that these four-legged friends are territorial by nature and value a territory they know well – where they get their daily sustenance and shelter – it shouldn’t be too surprising to know that they don’t fancy travel much.

Of course, there will always be the odd one, but for the most part, dogs aren’t the best travelers.

You know what that means, right?

The boxes everywhere, endless errands, a slowly emptying house, and the long cross-country journey is likely to put undue stress on them as much as it does on you.

Fortunately, when it comes to embarking on that long haul across the states, there are steps you can take to make your canine friend more comfortable.

Establish Where Your Dog Will Sit Ahead Of Time

Whether they are traveling in a car restraint or crate, you need to pack the vehicle first and leave sufficient room for the dog to sit and lay down comfortably. The same applies if you intend your dog to travel uncrated.

Usually, the backseat of the car or trunk should work fine.

If you are hiring the services of long distance movers, let them know in advance you will be traveling with your dog.

Otherwise, ensure this area is safe and devoid of any hazards such as sharp objects or anything the dog might choke on.

Long-distance moves can be made more bearable by providing the dog with a toy and making them even cozier with their favorite blanket.

Select Your Restraint Option

Accidents do happen and when they do, make sure your favorite furry friend is secure. This is why you need to choose a restraint option for them when moving long-distance.

Carry boxes with harness attachments, zip-line harnesses, and harness seat belts , they are good options. You can also try backseat hammocks, dog guards (when putting the dog in the trunk), backseat barriers, and crates too.

In some states like New Jersey, animal cruelty laws require you to have a car restraint for your dog.

And while the picturesque scenery of Hawaii may tempt you to have the dog stick out their head out the window of the car to soak in the splendid views, this could attract a fine if the car is in motion. Same as driving with the dog in your lap.

Plan For Stress

When moving long-distance, your dog is likely to get stressed. This doesn’t only affect the anxious types, but if your dog is especially prone to car-related stress, it is good to anticipate and plan for this.

Talk to your vet at least a month before moving day so they can arrange for some anti-anxiety medication to keep your dog calm during the drive.

You can also help by providing them with familiar items such as a familiar favorite toy or blanket.

Avoid Feeding Before The Journey

As you know, it is important to maintain a regular routine for our dogs, even during the moving process.

However, when the moving day arrives, depending on the time you will be taking the journey, you’re allowed to tweak their feeding schedule to avoid them throwing up.

A pre-travel meal should be provided at least three hours prior.

Plan For Breaks

Lastly, schedule some rest stops every two or three hours during which you can leash your dog and let them relax and explore a little.

It will set you back a bit time-wise, but the dog will greatly appreciate this. Plus, they can also make use of the periodic stops to release themselves.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q1: How much does it cost to move my dog across the country?

A: the costs depend on the distance and the needs of your pooch. The average cost is 120 to 250 dollars within 300 miles. For a longer distance, it will cost you 270 to 500 dollars. 

Q2: Can I ship my dog through FedEx?

A: Absolutely not, your dog is not a thing, it’s a living being. FedEx doesn’t do live animal shipments. 

Q3: Can a dog be flown by itself?

A: Generally all airlines accept pets in cargo, except SouthWest airlines and jet blue, also smaller commuter airlines. Airlines help you and your dog to travel, always are safe and reach safely at the destination. 

Q4: How stressful is flying for dogs?

A: It is very stressful for them, they do not like the suffocating feeling when they are in an aircraft’s cargo hold. “ dogs are terrified of flying” says Kristen Theisen, director of pet care issues of the Humane Society of the United States. 

Q5: Is cargo safe for my dog?

A: No they are not, the human and safest way is to book another seat next to you. Or get them in-cabin as carry-on luggage. 

Closing Thoughts

Your dog, should be your first priority. Its not just you who is going to be exhausted after travelling, it your canine friend too. A home is complete with a dog, make sure he or she is absolutely fine, during and after travel as well as in the new home. Take care of them, because to them you are thier entire world.

 

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Rashmi
Rashmi

Rashmi Chaudhuri a passionate traveler and the natural beauty trends concerning the professional content writer. She loves writing about beauty, travel, animals, sports, tech and health. She is a freelance writer who loves to write SEO-friendly contents about these topics with expert writing skills.

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